We use cookies to make sure our website better meets your expectations.
You can adjust your web browser's settings to stop accepting cookies. For further information, read our cookie policy.
SEARCH
IN Warsaw
Exchange Rates
Warsaw Stock Exchange - Indices
The Warsaw Voice » Culture » April 23, 2008
Wroc³aw
You have to be logged in to use the ReadSpeaker utility and listen to a text. It's free-of-charge. Just log in to the site or register if you are not registered user yet.
Traditional and Modern Tunisian Ceramics
April 23, 2008   
Article's tools:
Print

The Ethnographic Museum in Wroc³aw is hosting an exhibition of traditional Berber pottery and more modern Tunisian ceramics based on medieval Arab designs. On show are 150 items in total, including examples of Arabic calligraphy, bird cages, traditional dress, posters and photographs.

The most space is devoted to Berber pottery from the town of Sedznan, where the last traditional pottery workshops in Tunisia are still in existence. The local craftsmen make the pots by hand, dry them in the sun and fire them using a bonfire. The simple decoration used on the pots is reminiscent of that used on ancient Egyptian pottery. The Sedznan locals make pots that they need for everyday life but, ever mindful of tourists, also produce salt cellars and ashtrays. Some pots are decorated with pictures of storks, which winter in the area and are a huge tourist attraction.

The Berber pottery is displayed together with items made in workshops mainly by people with some artistic training. These items, based on medieval Arab designs from Andalusia, are popular with tourists. This is why the Berber potters are changing their traditional designs to ones in keeping with modern tastes and producing vases, plant pots and bowls. They have simplified the traditional Arabic and plant decorative motifs and done away with the Arabic calligraphy. Instead they use animal motifs in the decoration and sometimes even human figures and openwork patterns.

Until June 8, Ethnographic Museum in Wroc³aw, 111/113 Traugutta St.
© The Warsaw Voice 2010-2018
E-mail Marketing Powered by SARE