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The Warsaw Voice » Other » September 30, 2009
POLAND - NATO
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Growing Transatlantic Ties
September 30, 2009   
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April 6, 1990
A NATO summit in London adopted the London Declaration in which Warsaw Pact member states were invited to establish partnership relations and develop military contacts.

March 31, 1991
The military structures of the Warsaw Pact were dissolved, and in July 1991 the organization was formally disbanded.

Oct. 6, 1991
In Cracow, the presidents of Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Poland expressed the desire of their states to participate in NATO activities.

Dec. 20, 1991
The North Atlantic Cooperation Council (NACC) held its inaugural session in Brussels with the participation of 16 NATO members and nine states of Central Europe. The council became a forum for collaboration between NATO and the states of Central and Eastern Europe.

March 10, 1992
An extraordinary meeting of the foreign affairs ministers and representatives of the member states of the North Atlantic Cooperation Council announced the first Plan of Work for Dialog, Partnership and Cooperation (NACC Work Plan).

March 11-12, 1992
NATO Secretary-General Manfred Wörner, visiting Poland, declared "the door to NATO is open."

April 10, 1992
The Military Committee of NATO held its first meeting with the participation of Central and Eastern European defense ministers and chiefs of staff.

Jan. 10, 1994
A NATO summit in Brussels invited the states of Central and Eastern Europe, including states established after the breakup of the USSR, to enter into cooperation with the alliance within the Partnership for Peace (PFP) program.

Jan. 12, 1994
The presidents of the Visegrad Group countries (Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia and Poland), meeting U.S. President Bill Clinton in Prague, accepted the Partnership for Peace program.

April 25, 1994
Poland submitted its Partnership for Peace Presentation Document at NATO Headquarters.

May 12, 1994
The defense ministers of Denmark, Germany and Poland decided in Warsaw to conduct joint military exercises on the Baltic in the autumn within "the framework of PFP."

July 5, 1994
Poland and NATO adopted the "Individual Partnership Program" (IPP). Poland became the first PFP state to agree to its Individual Partnership Program with the Alliance.

Sept. 12-16, 1994
First joint military exercises (code-named "Cooperative Bridge") in the framework of Partnership for Peace were held at Biedrusko near Poznań with participation of units from 13 NATO members and partner countries.

Oct. 8, 1994
The U.S. Congress adopted the NATO Participation Act authorizing the U.S. president to extend the benefits of allied military cooperation with NATO to Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary.

Dec. 1, 1994
The North Atlantic Council, meeting at the foreign ministerial level, confirmed that in accordance with Article 10 of the Washington Treaty, the alliance remained open to future membership of other European states. U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher announced that the United States wished to initiate talks with countries interested in joining the alliance as early as 1995.

Feb. 16, 1995
The U.S. House of Representatives adopted the National Security Revitalization Act envisaging enlargement of NATO to include the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia and Hungary.

May 26-29, 1995
The North Atlantic Assembly convened in Budapest (for the first time in a non-NATO country). It endorsed expansion of the alliance by admitting Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Slovenia by the end of 1988-with a simultaneous strengthening of relations with Russia.

Aug. 8-26, 1995
PFP military exercises code-named "Cooperative Nugget" were held in Fort Polk, Louisiana, with the participation of troops from 14 NATO states and partner countries including Poland, the first such exercises on American soil.

Sept. 9-20, 1995
Joint Polish-German military exercises code-named "Combined Endeavor" were held in Germany within the framework of PFP.

Dec. 5, 1995
The Polish government decided to send a military contingent to Bosnia as part of IFOR operations.

Jan. 17, 1996
President Aleksander Kwaśniewski visited NATO Headquarters in Brussels. During a meeting with NATO Secretary-General Javier Solana, he stressed the continuity of Poland's foreign policy goals, including membership in NATO.

Feb. 8, 1996
In a joint letter to the secretary-general of NATO, the Polish ministers of defense and foreign affairs formally accepted the alliance's invitation of Jan. 29, 1996, to begin Individual Dialog with NATO.

June 19-22, 1996
An Annual (13th) NATO Workshop took place in Warsaw, the first such event to be held in Poland.

July 26, 1996
The U.S. Senate adopted a bill granting military aid to Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic and Slovenia as the countries most qualified to join NATO.

Oct. 22, 1996
President Bill Clinton, in a speech in Detroit, for the first time disclosed a specific date for the expansion of NATO. He stated that the first new members from among the countries of Central and Eastern Europe should be admitted into the Atlantic Alliance no later than 1999 (50th anniversary of the alliance).

Dec. 17, 1996
The Polish Council of Ministers adopted resolution No.146/96 formally endorsing participation of a Polish contingent of "up to 500 men" in SFOR in Bosnia.

Feb. 18, 1997
U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright told a meeting of NATO Foreign Ministers in Brussels that NATO membership negotiations of the first group of Central and East European states-to be determined by the NATO summit in Madrid-should be completed by December 1997. This would make it possible to sign protocols of accession at the December ministerial meeting of the alliance and to give the parliaments of NATO countries enough time to ratify them by 1999.

Feb. 24, 1997
The U.S. Department of State published a report prepared for Congress on NATO expansion, including cost estimates. Direct costs were estimated at $9 billion-$12 billion (1997-2009), total costs (including modernization)-at $27 billion-$35 billion, during the same period. Direct costs to new members-$3 billion-$4.5 billion.

March 14, 1997
The North Atlantic Council published a statement in which NATO declared that in the present and foreseeable conditions in Europe, the alliance did not see a need for permanent additional stationing of significant forces of the alliance on the territories of the present and future members.

July 8, 1997
A NATO summit of heads of state and government officials in Madrid decided to invite Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary to begin talks on membership in the alliance.

Aug. 1, 1997
The Sejm adopted a resolution authorizing the government to enter into accession talks and obligating it to assure NATO of readiness to assume commitments and to cover the essential costs of membership.

Sept. 16, 1997
Poland and NATO began accession talks.

Nov. 10, 1997
The foreign minister of Poland sent a letter to NATO Secretary-General, in which the Polish side officially accepted the size of its contribution (2.48 percent) to the budgets of the alliance: civilian, military and the NATO Security Investment Program (NSIP).

Dec. 16, 1997
NATO's foreign ministers signed Accession Protocols for Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary in Brussels. The protocols were to be subject to ratification in the 16 countries of the alliance in 1998.

Dec. 28, 1997
Representatives of Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary participated for the first time (with observer status) in the weekly meeting of the North Atlantic Council, at the ambassadorial level.

Feb. 2, 1998
Canada became the first member of the alliance to ratify the Accession Protocols, and on Feb. 4 conveyed the ratification documents to the U.S. State Department.

Feb. 3, 1998
The parliament of Denmark ratified the Accession Protocols, which on Feb. 17 were conveyed to the U.S. State Department.

March 3, 1998
The parliament of Norway accepted the Accession Protocols of Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary. On March 17, Norway conveyed the instruments of ratification to the government of the United States.

March 11, 1998
The prime ministers of Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary decided during a meeting in London to jointly convey documents of accession to the government of the United States.

March 26, 1998
Germany's Bundestag, and-on March 27-the Bundesrat accepted ratification documents of the Accession Protocols, which on April 24 were submitted to the U.S. State Department.

April 30, 1998
The U.S. Senate approved ratification documents of the Protocols of Accession, which on Aug. 20 were conveyed to the State Department.

May 13, 1998
Italy's Senate, and-on June 16-the Chamber of Deputies of Parliament adopted ratification documents of the Accession Protocols, which on Sept. 23 were submitted to the U.S. State Department.

May 14, 1998
The Greek parliament concluded ratification of the Accession Protocols. On July 31, the documents of ratification were submitted to the U.S. State Department.

May 20, 1998
The French Senate adopted the Accession Protocols; on June 10 they were adopted by the National Assembly, and on July 15 the documents of ratification were conveyed to the U.S. State Department.

May 21, 1998
Spain's Cortes, and-on June 23-the country's Senate accepted the Accession Protocols, which were conveyed to the U.S. State Department on July 29.

May 27, 1998
Accession to NATO of Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary was accepted by the parliament of Luxembourg. On July 24, the documents of ratification were conveyed to the U.S. State Department.

June 4, 1998
The parliament of Iceland adopted the Accession Protocols and on Aug. 25 conveyed the ratification documents to the U.S. State Department.

July 9, 1998
Belgium's Senate, and-on July 16-the Chamber of Representatives adopted ratification documents of the Accession Protocols, which on Sept. 14 were conveyed to the U.S. State Department.

July 17, 1998
The House of Commons, and-on June 31-the House of Lords adopted ratification documents of the Accession Protocols. On Aug. 17, Great Britain conveyed the documents to the U.S. State Department.

Sept. 5, 1998
In Szczecin, the defense ministers of Poland, Denmark and Germany signed a declaration on the creation of a Multinational North-Eastern Corps. After Poland joins NATO, the corps is to be at the disposal of NATO operational requirements. Its headquarters will be in Szczecin.

Sept. 16, 1998
The parliament of Portugal accepted ratification documents of the Accession Protocols and on Dec. 3 conveyed them to the U.S. State Department.

Sept. 19-Oct. 6, 1998
Polish-British exercises code-named "Uhlan Eagle 98" were held at Drawsko. Some 5,500 British troops took part.

Oct. 6, 1998
The Dutch Senate, and-on Dec. 1-the lower house of the country's parliament adopted ratification documents of the Accession Protocols, which on Dec. 4 were conveyed to the U.S. State Department.

Oct. 20, 1998
Poland's Council of Ministers adopted and conveyed to the Sejm a draft bill on ratification by Poland of the North Atlantic Treaty.

Oct. 21, 1998
Turkey's parliament adopted ratification documents of the Accession Protocols and conveyed them to the U.S. State Department on Dec. 3.

Feb. 17, 1999
Poland 's Parliament passes the law allowing the President to ratify the North Atlantic Treaty.

Feb. 26, 1999
President Aleksander Kwaśniewski ratifies the North Atlantic Treaty.

March 12, 1999
Minister of Foreign Affairs Bronisław Geremek submits the ratification treaty with the Treaty's Depository Office.
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