We use cookies to make sure our website better meets your expectations.
You can adjust your web browser's settings to stop accepting cookies. For further information, read our cookie policy.
SEARCH
IN Warsaw
Exchange Rates
Warsaw Stock Exchange - Indices
The Warsaw Voice » Special Sections » September 29, 2014
Safe Cash
You have to be logged in to use the ReadSpeaker utility and listen to a text. It's free-of-charge. Just log in to the site or register if you are not registered user yet.
Improved Security for Polish Banknotes
September 29, 2014   
Article's tools:
Print

In April this year, Narodowy Bank Polski started the process of gradually replacing old notes with new ones boasting improved security features. The aim is to increase the security of cash transactions.

According to NBP, the banknote security features introduced in 1995 and the cash circulation system are working well and the level of forgery is low. “Counterfeiting is relatively rare in the case of Polish notes—around eight counterfeits per 1 million notes in circulation—but the technological change that has occurred in banknote security over the past 20 years requires modernized security measures for notes in general circulation,” said Marek Oleś, director of NBP’s Cash and Issue Department. This is the first modernization of the security features of the “Polish Rulers” series of banknotes that was designed by Andrzej Heidrich and put into circulation in 1995.

Such measures are nothing unusual. They are carried out on a regular basis by central banks all over the world. For instance, the European Central Bank issued a modernized 5-euro banknote this year. New banknote security measures were also introduced by Spain (seven years before joining the eurozone) as well as Slovakia and Estonia—three and four years prior to adopting the single European currency respectively.

The maintenance of the highest level of security for cash transactions in the years to come is the main, but not the only, reason for modernizing security features of Polish banknotes. Another reason relates to the needs of commercial banks and cash-in-transit companies, which are entrusted with the physical transfer of banknotes and coins.

Banknotes have been redesigned especially for these organizations so that counting machines can work more quickly. Yet another reason is technological change and money issuance costs. The modernized notes are cheaper than the old ones owing to higher prices of the materials used in the old technology. By introducing new security features, NBP may rely on an ample array of solutions available on the market.

Changing the security features of banknotes is a purely technical process. The graphic design has remained unchanged, but the use of new security features explains why the differences between the new and old notes are visible. The notes that have been modernized are as follows: 10-, 20-, 50- and 100-zloty notes. The 200-zloty note remains unchanged for now, but work on modernizing its security features has already begun.

The new banknotes will replace destroyed or damaged notes withdrawn from circulation as part of standard operations based on supplying commercial banks with cash. However, all banknotes currently in use will remain legal tender indefinitely, which means that since April both old and new banknotes have been in circulation. How long will the process of replacing the old notes with the new ones take? “That depends on the life span of the banknotes, which is relatively short (approximately a year and a half) in the case of 10- and 20-zloty notes and over two years in the case of the 50-zloty note; it is considerably longer with the 100-zloty note,” says Oleś.

The modernized security features of the new notes are easy to spot. The most important changes in the design of the notes include an uncovered watermark field, introduction of iridescent ink and an improved recto-verso security feature. Another change introduced to the new notes is an additional single-tone watermark. The most noticeable change is a blank field where in the old notes there is a strip matching the rest of the banknote in color. This blank space is designed to help money sorting machines evaluate how dirty the banknotes are. In addition, it is easier to see the watermark on the new notes, which is usually the first thing users do when checking if the note is genuine. On the old banknotes the watermark is the head of the ruler depicted on the banknote. The modernized notes also feature a single-tone watermark showing the nominal value, visible on the white background. This makes the authenticity check faster and easier.

In all the banknotes the see-through register on both sides of the note has been changed in the upper right-hand corner. Due to this, when held up against the light, the imprints on both sides of the note complement each other to form an image of a crown in an oval. The old banknotes contain this feature as well, but with a different design. Every banknote has features designed for the visually impaired that help identify the banknote by touch: the value numerals, the portrait of the sovereign, Poland’s state emblem and signatures of the President of Narodowy Bank Polski and of the bank’s Chief Treasurer.

Apart from changes common to all the notes, each banknote has been provided with some specific security features. For example, 10- and 20-zloty notes have a metalized strip on the back. The strip is of a specific color corresponding to the color of the note itself—turquoise for the 10-zloty note and lilac for the 20-zloty note; it sparkles in the light and contains an inscription matching the value of the note.

The 10-zloty note contains the image of Prince Mieszko I. On his left-hand side there are two rosettes inspired by those on the floor of the historic Gniezno Cathedral in central-western Poland, and to the right of the ruler’s portrait there a floral motif characteristic of Romanesque liturgical vessels. The back of the note contains an image of a silver denar coin from the time of Mieszko I, with a depiction of a chapel dome or an image of a crown with a small cross. On both sides of the denar there are images of stylized Romanesque columns from the Benedictine abbey in Tyniec, a historic village in Poland and now part of the city of Cracow.

The 20-zloty note contains a portrait of King Bolesław I the Brave. To the left of the portrait there is an outline of a Romanesque portal, and to the right—a depiction of the crown of an oak tree from the Gniezno Doors—a pair of bronze doors at the entrance to Gniezno Cathedral that are one of the most significant works of Romanesque art in Poland. Gniezno is a former capital of the Polish state.

The back of the 20-zloty note is adorned with an image of the silver denar of King Bolesław I the Brave with an outline of a bird and the inscription “Princes Poloniae.” On the left there is an image of the Rotunda of St. Nicholas in Cieszyn, in southern Poland, and to the right of the portrait is the image of a lion set against the background of a floral ornament from the frame of the Gniezno Doors.

The 50-zloty note is ornamented with a portrait of King Kazimierz III the Great. On his right there is a crowned letter “K” from the king’s monogram on the doors of Wawel Cathedral in Cracow, with Gothic ornamentation in the background. The back of the note contains a depiction of the White Eagle from King Kazimierz III the Great’s royal seal, with the royal insignia—the orb and the scepter—underneath. In the background, there is a panorama of Cracow and its historical Kazimierz district from a woodcut by Hartmann Schedel, a German traveler from the end of the 15th century. The letter “K” is printed in a new color. Looking at the banknote from different angles, it is possible to see how the color of the letter changes smoothly from green to blue.

The 100-zloty note has undergone the most extensive makeover. It contains a portrait of King Władysław II Jagiełło with stylized Gothic ornamentation in the background on both sides. The back of the note features an image of the White Eagle on the coat of arms from the king’s tombstone. Below the coat of arms there is a helmet, a Teutonic knight’s cape, and two swords referring to the victorious Battle of Grunwald against the Teutonic Order of knights in 1410. To the left of the coat of arms there is an outline of the Teutonic Castle in Malbork. Owing to the white area, the banknote appears to be lighter in color. The rosette to the right of the portrait changes its color smoothly from golden to green. Depending on the angle from which you look at the banknote, to the left of the portrait it is possible to see the value of the note spelled out, the numeral “100”, and in between these two, the acronym “NBP.”

Apart from the changes visible to the naked eye, other security features have also been introduced that make it easier to identify the banknotes by money sorting and counting machines used in banks and cash-in-transit companies. Due to all this, the new Polish banknotes are among the most secure in the world.


More information about the new security features of Polish banknotes is available at www.nbp.pl


Characteristic elements of the modernized 10-zloty banknote:
- Watermark showing value numeral may be seen against the light in the field free from print (1)
- Turquoise-colored iridescent strip (3)
- In an oval – a crown, the complete image of which can be seen when the banknote is held against the light (4)
- Face value, portrait of the sovereign, emblem of the Republic of Poland and the signatures of the NBP President and the NBP General Treasurer are in raised print, which is easy to feel, also for the visually impaired.
1. More developed watermark. When you examine the banknote against the light the watermark depicting the sovereign and the value numeral “10” can be seen.
The watermark field is free from print.
2. Security thread. When you hold a banknote against the light, a dark vertical line with the value numeral “10” and the currency abbreviation “ZŁ” is visible. Both features are legible in a mirror as well. The typeface of the microlettering has been modified. The security thread has been incorporated in the paper substrate.
3. Iridescent strip. On the reverse side of the banknote there is a turquoise-colored strip with the value numeral “10” and “ZŁ” symbol. The strip becomes visible depending on the angle at which the banknote is viewed.
4. See-through register (recto-verso). When the banknote is held against the light, the elements of the graphic design printed on each side combine perfectly to form a complete image – a crown in an oval.
5. Latent image. A light or dark value numeral “10” appears in a single latent image when tilting the banknote – depending on the angle that the note is held at.
6. Microlettering. Microlettering is writing visible only with the use of magnification that was printed both on the front and on the reverse side of the banknote.


Characteristic elements of the modernized 20-zloty banknote:
- Watermark showing value numeral may be seen against the light in the field free from print (1)
- Lilac-colored iridescent strip (3)
- In an oval – a crown, the complete image of which can be seen when the banknote is held against the light (4)
- Face value, portrait of the sovereign, emblem of the Republic of Poland and the signatures of the NBP President and the NBP General Treasurer are in raised print that is easy to feel, also for the visually impaired.
1. More developed watermark. When you examine the banknote against the light the watermark depicting the sovereign and the value numeral “20” can be seen.
The watermark field is free from print.
2. Security thread. When you hold a banknote against the light, a dark vertical line with the value numeral “20” and the currency abbreviation “ZŁ” is visible. Both features are legible in a mirror as well. The typeface of the microlettering has been modified. The security thread has been incorporated in the paper substrate.
3. Iridescent strip. On the reverse side of the banknote there is a lilac strip with the value numeral “20” and “ZŁ” symbol. The strip becomes visible depending on the angle at which the banknote is viewed.
4. See-through register (recto-verso). When the banknote is held against the light, the elements of the graphic design printed on each side combine perfectly to form a complete image – a crown in an oval.
5. Latent image. A light or dark value numeral “20” appears in a single latent image when tilting the banknote– depending on the angle that the note is held at.
6. Microlettering. Microlettering is writing visible only with the use of magnification that was printed both on the front and on the reverse side of the banknote.


Characteristic elements of the modernized 50-zloty banknote:
- Watermark showing value numeral may be seen against the light in the field free from print (1)
- Letter “K”, smoothly changing color from green to blue (3)
- In an oval – a crown, the complete image of which can be seen when the banknote is held against the light (4)
- Face value, portrait of the sovereign, emblem of the Republic of Poland and the signatures of the NBP President and the NBP General Treasurer are in raised print that is easy to feel, also for the visually impaired.
1. More developed watermark. When you examine the banknote against the light the watermark depicting the sovereign and the value numeral “50” can be seen.
The watermark field is free from print.
2. Security thread. When you hold a banknote against the light, a dark vertical line with the value numeral “50” and the currency abbreviation “ZŁ” is visible. Both features are legible in a mirror as well. The typeface of the microlettering has been modified. The security thread has been incorporated in the paper substrate.
3. The royal letter changing color (color-shifting ink). As you change the angle at which you look at the banknote, the color of the “K” letter smoothly changes from green to blue.
4. See-through register (recto-verso). When the banknote is held against the light, the elements of the graphic design printed on each side combine perfectly to form a complete image – a crown in an oval.
5. Latent image. A crown or the value numeral “50” appears in a single latent image when tilting the banknote – depending on the angle that the note is held at.
6. Microlettering. Microlettering is writing visible only with the use of magnification that was printed both on the front and on the reverse side of the banknote.


Characteristic elements of the modernized 100-zloty banknote:
- Watermark showing value numeral may be seen against the light in the field free from print (1)
- Rosette, smoothly changing color from gold to green (3)
- In an oval – a crown, the complete image of which can be seen when the banknote is held against the light (4)
- Face value, portrait of the sovereign, emblem of the Republic of Poland and the signatures of the NBP President and the NBP General Treasurer are in raised print that is easy to feel, also for the visually impaired.
1. More developed watermark. When you examine the banknote against the light the watermark depicting the sovereign and the value numeral “100” can be seen.
The watermark field is free from print.
2. Security thread. When you hold a banknote against the light, a dark vertical line with the value numeral “100” and the currency abbreviation “ZŁ” is visible. Both features are legible in a mirror as well. The typeface of the microlettering has been modified. The security thread has been incorporated in the paper substrate.
3. A rosette changing color (color-shifting ink). As the angle at which you look at the banknote changes, the color of the rosette smoothly changes from gold to green.
4. See-through register (recto-verso). When the banknote is held against the light, the elements of the graphic design seen combine perfectly to form a complete image – a crown in an oval.
5. Latent image. Depending on the angle that the note is held at, a crown or value numeral “100” appears in a single latent image to the right of the portrait of the sovereign, whereas to the left of the portrait – the face value of the banknote in words and as a numeral, with acronym NBP in between.
6. Microlettering. Microletteringis writing visible only with the use of magnification that was printed both on the front and on the reverse side of the banknote.



Bezpieczne pieniądze
Nowe zabezpieczenia polskich banknotów

W kwietniu tego roku Narodowy Bank Polski (NBP) rozpoczął stopniowe wprowadzanie do obiegu banknotów ze zmodernizowanymi zabezpieczeniami. Głównym celem tej operacji jest zwiększenie bezpieczeństwa obrotu gotówkowego.

Według przedstawicieli NBP, wprowadzone w 1995 roku zabezpieczenia banknotów oraz system zasilania obrotu gotówkowego działają bez zarzutu, a poziom fałszerstw znaków pieniężnych jest w Polsce niski. „Obecnie polskie banknoty są fałszowane stosunkowo rzadko – około 8 fałszerstw na milion banknotów w obiegu – ale postęp technologiczny, który dokonał się w ciągu ostatnich 20 lat w dziedzinie zabezpieczeń banknotów, wymaga przeprowadzenia technicznej operacji polegającej na modernizacji zabezpieczeń banknotów powszechnego obiegu”, powiedział Marek Oleś, dyrektor Departamentu Emisyjno-Skarbcowego NBP. Jest to pierwsza modernizacja zabezpieczeń banknotów serii „Władcy polscy” autorstwa Andrzeja Heidricha, która została wprowadzona w 1995 roku.

Takie działania nie są czymś niezwykłym, co jakiś czas podejmują je banki centralne na całym świecie. Np. w tym roku Europejski Bank Centralny wprowadził do obiegu zmodernizowany banknot o nominale 5 euro. Nowe zabezpieczenia banknotów wprowadziły także Hiszpania – 7 lat przed wstąpieniem do strefy euro – oraz Słowacja na 3 i Estonia na 4 lata przed przyjęciem wspólnej europejskiej waluty.

Utrzymanie najwyższego poziomu bezpieczeństwa obrotu gotówkowego w perspektywie najbliższych lat to główny, ale nie jedyny powód modernizacji zabezpieczeń polskich banknotów. Drugim powodem jest uwzględnienie wymogów uczestników obrotu gotówkowego, czyli banków komercyjnych sortujących banknoty oraz firm cash in transit, zajmujących się obsługą pieniądza gotówkowego. Specjalnie dla tych instytucji przeprojektowano banknoty tak, aby urządzenia liczące mogły je sprawniej czytać. Kolejnym istotnym powodem było uwzględnienie postępu technologicznego, z którym wiążą się też koszty emisji. Banknoty zmodernizowane są tańsze od dotychczasowych z uwagi na wzrost rynkowej ceny komponentów stosowanych w starych technologiach. Zmieniając zabezpieczenia na nowe, można korzystać z dostępnego obecnie szerokiego rynku zabezpieczeń.

Zmiana zabezpieczeń banknotów jest operacją czysto techniczną. Projekty graficzne banknotów się nie zmieniły, ale zastosowanie nowych zabezpieczeń powoduje, że różnice pomiędzy zmodernizowanymi banknotami a dotychczas używanymi są widoczne. Modernizacji poddano banknoty o nominałach 10, 20, 50 i 100 zł. Banknot o nominale 200 złotych na razie pozostanie bez zmian, ale prace nad modernizacją jego zabezpieczeń już się rozpoczęły.

Nowe banknoty zastąpią zniszczone lub uszkodzone banknoty wycofywane z obiegu w ramach standardowych operacji zasilających banki komercyjne w gotówkę. Ale – jak przypomina w komunikacie NBP – wszystkie obecnie używane banknoty bezterminowo pozostaną prawnym środkiem płatniczym. Od kwietnia w obiegu funkcjonują więc zarówno banknoty z nowymi zabezpieczeniami, jak i banknoty dotychczasowej emisji. To stwarza pytanie, jak długo będzie trwał proces wymiany. „Odpowiedź zależy od tzw. cyklu życia banknotu, który w przypadku nominałów 10 i 20 zł jest relatywnie krótki (ok. 1,5 roku), w przypadku banknotu 50 zł wynosi ponad 2 lata i znacząco wydłuża się w przypadku nominału 100-złotowego”, poinformował Marek Oleś.

Wprowadzone zmodernizowane zabezpieczenia banknotów są łatwe do zauważenia. Najważniejsze zmiany w wyglądzie banknotów to: odkryte pole znaku wodnego, wprowadzenie farby opalizującej i ulepszone zabezpieczenie recto-verso, czyli uzupełniający się druk obustronny. We wszystkich nowych banknotach wprowadzono też dodatkowy jednotonowy znak wodny.

Najbardziej widoczna różnica polega na tym, że na wszystkich nowych banknotach występuje odkryte, niezadrukowane, białe pole w miejscu, gdzie dotychczas był pas w kolorze tła nominału. Niezadrukowane pole jest ułatwieniem dla maszynowego sortowania banknotów, ponieważ dzięki niemu można oceniać poziom ich zabrudzenia. Istotną zmianą jest ułatwienie odczytania znaku wodnego, który jest pierwszym elementem badania autentyczności banknotu przez użytkowników. W banknotach starej emisji znakiem jest głowa władcy, którego wizerunek widnieje na banknocie. W banknotach zmodernizowanych dodano jeszcze jednotonowy znak wodny, przedstawiający nominał, który widać w białym polu. Takie zabezpieczenie umożliwi szybkie i łatwe sprawdzenie autentyczności banknotu.

We wszystkich nominałach w prawym górnym rogu zmieniono uzupełniający się w przechodzącym świetle nadruk, który nazywa się recto-verso. Dzięki temu, kiedy banknot ogląda się pod światło, nadruki z przedniej i odwrotnej strony banknotu uzupełniają się, tworząc koronę w owalu. Na dotychczasowych banknotach również jest ten znak, ale inaczej zaprojektowany. Wszystkie banknoty mają wyczuwalne w dotyku, także dla osób niewidomych, oznaczenia nominału, portret władcy, godło Polski, podpisy Prezesa i Głównego Skarbnika NBP.

Poza zmianami wspólnymi dla wszystkich nominałów każdy z nominałów zyskał dodatkowe zabezpieczenia, charakterystyczne tylko dla niego. Przykładowo, banknoty 10 i 20 zł mają na odwrotnej stronie pas opalizujący. Jest to mieniący się w świetle pas odpowiadający kolorowi nominału – turkusowy na banknocie 10-złotowym i liliowy na 20-złotowym – z napisem odpowiadającym danemu nominałowi: 10 zł i 20 zł. Banknot o nominale 10 złotych zdobi portret księcia Mieszka I. Z jego lewej strony przedstawiono dwie rozety inspirowane wzorem z posadzki katedry gnieźnieńskiej, z prawej – roślinny motyw spotykany na romańskich naczyniach liturgicznych. Na odwrotnej stronie umieszczono srebrny denar z wizerunkiem kopuły kaplicy lub wyobrażeniem korony z krzyżykiem. Po obu stronach denara znajdują się stylizowane kolumny romańskie z opactwa benedyktynów w Tyńcu.

Z kolei na banknocie o nominale 20 złotych widnieje portret króla Bolesława I Chrobrego. Z jego lewej strony znajduje się portal romański, zaś z prawej – korona młodego dębu z Drzwi Gnieźnieńskich ze sceny wystawienia zwłok św. Wojciecha. Stronę odwrotną zdobi srebrny denar Bolesława I Chrobrego z sylwetką ptaka i napisem Princes Poloniae. Z lewej strony umieszczono wizerunek rotundy św. Mikołaja w Cieszynie, a z prawej – lwa rozpiętego na wici roślinnej z obramowania Drzwi Gnieźnieńskich.

Banknot o nominale 50 złotych zdobi portret króla Kazimierza III Wielkiego. Z jego prawej strony widnieje ukoronowana litera „K” z monogramu królewskiego z drzwi katedry na Wawelu, a w tle ornament gotycki. Odwrotną stronę zdobi Orzeł Biały z pieczęci króla Kazimierza III Wielkiego, a poniżej widać berło i jabłko – insygnia królewskie. W tle widnieje panorama Krakowa i Kazimierza z drzeworytu Hartmanna Schedla, podróżnika niemieckiego z końca XV wieku. Na banknocie 50 zł nowością jest zmiana farby, którą wydrukowano królewską literę „K”. Wraz ze zmianą kąta patrzenia jej kolor płynnie przechodzi z zielonego w niebieski.

Najwięcej zmian widocznych jest na banknocie 100 zł. Na tym banknocie umieszczono portret króla Władysława II Jagiełły. W tle po jego obu stronach znajdują się stylizowane elementy ornamentyki gotyckiej. Stronę odwrotną zdobi Orzeł Biały na tarczy herbowej z nagrobka króla. Poniżej tarczy umieszczono hełm, płaszcz krzyżacki oraz dwa miecze nawiązujące do zwycięskiej bitwy pod Grunwaldem w 1410 roku. Z lewej strony tarczy widnieje zarys zamku krzyżackiego w Malborku. Dzięki polu bieli banknot wydaje się jaśniejszy. Rozeta z prawej strony portretu płynnie zmienia kolor ze złotego na zielony. W zależności od kąta patrzenia z lewej strony portretu władcy widać słowne i cyfrowe oznaczenia nominału, a pomiędzy nimi skrót „NBP”.

Poza zmianami widocznymi gołym okiem wprowadzono także wiele innych zabezpieczeń, które są odczytywane przez urządzenia sortujące i liczące, co jest ułatwieniem dla banków i firm obsługujących obrót gotówki. Wszystko to sprawia, że nowe polskie banknoty są jednymi z najlepiej zabezpieczonych znaków pieniężnych na świecie.


Więcej informacji na temat nowych zabezpieczeń banknotów można znaleźć na stronach www.nbp.pl


Charakterystyczne elementy zmodernizowanego banknotu 10-złotowego:
- Znak wodny z cyfrowym oznaczeniem nominału widoczny pod światło na niezadrukowanym polu (1),
- Pas opalizujący w kolorze turkusowym (3),
- Korona w owalu, której pełny obraz tworzy się podczas oglądania banknotu pod światło (4),
- Wyczuwalne przy dotyku, także dla osób niewidomych, oznaczenia nominału, portret władcy, godło RP, podpisy Prezesa i Głównego Skarbnika NBP.
1. Wzbogacony znak wodny. Podczas oglądania banknotu pod światło widać znak wodny przedstawiający wizerunek władcy oraz cyfrowe oznaczenie nominału “10”.
Pole znaku wodnego nie jest zadrukowane.
2. Nitka zabezpieczająca. Podczas oglądania banknotu pod światło widać pionową, ciemną linię z cyfrowym oznaczeniem nominału “10” i skrótem “ZŁ”, widocznymi również w odbiciu lustrzanym. Krój liter mikrotekstu został zmodyfikowany. Nitka zabezpieczająca została umieszczona w strukturze papieru.
3. Pas opalizujący. Na odwrotnej stronie banknotu został umieszczony opalizujący pas w kolorze turkusowym z cyfrowym oznaczeniem nominału “10” i skrótem “ZŁ”. Pas jest widoczny lub niedostrzegalny w zależności od kąta patrzenia.
4. Uzupełniający się druk obustronny (recto-verso).
Elementy graficzne znajdujące się na obu stronach banknotu oglądane pod światło uzupełniają się i tworzą pełny obraz - koronę w owalu.
5. Patrzenie pod kątem (efekt kątowy). W zależności od kąta patrzenia widać jasne lub ciemne cyfry oznaczenia nominału “10”.
6. Mikroskopijne napisy. Mikrodruki to czytelne jedynie w powiększeniu napisy umieszczone zarówno na przedniej, jak i odwrotnej stronie banknotu.


Charakterystyczne elementy zmodernizowanego banknotu 20-złotowego:
- Znak wodny z cyfrowym oznaczeniem nominału widoczny pod światło na niezadrukowanym polu (1),
- Pas opalizujący w kolorze liliowym (3),
- Korona w owalu, której pełny obraz tworzy się podczas oglądania banknotu pod światło (4),
- Wyczuwalne przy dotyku, także dla osób niewidomych, oznaczenia nominału, portret władcy, godło RP, podpisy Prezesa i Głównego Skarbnika NBP.
1. Wzbogacony znak wodny. Podczas oglądania banknotu pod światło widać znak wodny przedstawiający wizerunek władcy oraz cyfrowe oznaczenie nominału “20”.
Pole znaku wodnego nie jest zadrukowane.
2. Nitka zabezpieczająca. Podczas oglądania banknotu pod światło widać pionową, ciemną linię z cyfrowym oznaczeniem nominału “20” i skrótem “ZŁ”, widocznymi również w odbiciu lustrzanym. Krój liter mikrotekstu został zmodyfikowany. Nitka zabezpieczająca została umieszczona w strukturze papieru.
3. Pas opalizujący. Na odwrotnej stronie banknotu został umieszczony opalizujący pas w kolorze liliowym z cyfrowym oznaczeniem nominału “20” i skrótem “ZŁ”. Pas jest widoczny lub niedostrzegalny w zależności od kąta patrzenia.
4. Uzupełniający się druk obustronny (recto-verso).
Elementy graficzne znajdujące się na obu stronach banknotu oglądane pod światło uzupełniają się i tworzą pełny obraz - koronę w owalu.
5. Patrzenie pod kątem (efekt kątowy). W zależności od kąta patrzenia widać jasne lub ciemne cyfry oznaczenia nominału “20”.
6. Mikroskopijne napisy. Mikrodruki to czytelne jedynie w powiększeniu napisy umieszczone zarówno na przedniej, jak i odwrotnej stronie banknotu.


Charakterystyczne elementy zmodernizowanego banknotu 50-złotowego:
- Znak wodny z cyfrowym oznaczeniem nominału widoczny pod światło na niezadrukowanym polu (1),
- Litera “K” płynnie zmieniająca kolor z zielonego na niebieski (3),
- Korona w owalu, której pełny obraz tworzy się podczas oglądania banknotu pod światło (4),
- Wyczuwalne przy dotyku, także dla osób niewidomych, oznaczenia nominału, portret władcy, godło RP, podpisy Prezesa i Głównego Skarbnika NBP.
1. Wzbogacony znak wodny. Podczas oglądania banknotu pod światło
widać znak wodny przedstawiający wizerunek władcy oraz cyfrowe oznaczenie nominału “50”.
Pole znaku wodnego nie jest zadrukowane.
2. Nitka zabezpieczająca. Podczas oglądania banknotu pod światło widać pionową, ciemną linię z cyfrowym oznaczeniem nominału “50” i skrótem “ZŁ”, widocznymi również w odbiciu lustrzanym. Krój liter mikrotekstu został zmodyfikowany. Nitka zabezpieczająca została umieszczona w strukturze papieru.
3. Królewska litera zmieniająca kolor (farba zmienna optycznie). Wraz ze zmianą kąta patrzenia kolor stylizowanej litery “K” w koronie płynnie przechodzi z zielonego w niebieski.
4. Uzupełniający się druk obustronny (recto-verso). Elementy graficzne znajdujące się na obu stronach banknotu oglądane pod światło uzupełniają się i tworzą pełny obraz - koronę w owalu.
5. Patrzenie pod kątem (efekt kątowy). W zależności od kąta patrzenia
widać koronę lub cyfry oznaczenia nominału “50”.
6. Mikroskopijne napisy. Mikrodruki to czytelne jedynie w powiększeniu napisy umieszczone zarówno na przedniej, jak i odwrotnej stronie banknotu.


Charakterystyczne elementy zmodernizowanego banknotu 100-złotowego:
- Znak wodny z cyfrowym oznaczeniem nominału widoczny pod światło na niezadrukowanym polu (1),
- Rozeta płynnie zmieniająca kolor ze złotego na zielony (3),
- Korona w owalu, której pełny obraz tworzy się podczas oglądania banknotu pod światło (4),
- Wyczuwalne przy dotyku, także dla osób niewidomych, oznaczenia nominału, portret władcy, godło RP, podpisy Prezesa i Głównego Skarbnika NBP.
1. Wzbogacony znak wodny. Podczas oglądania banknotu pod światło widać znak wodny przedstawiający wizerunek władcy oraz cyfrowe oznaczenie nominału “100”. Pole znaku wodnego nie jest zadrukowane.
2. Nitka zabezpieczająca. Podczas oglądania banknotu pod światło widać pionową, ciemną linię z cyfrowym oznaczeniem nominału “100” i skrótem “ZŁ”, widocznymi również w odbiciu lustrzanym. Krój liter mikrotekstu został zmodyfikowany. Nitka zabezpieczająca została umieszczona w strukturze papieru.
3. Rozeta zmieniająca kolor (farba zmienna optycznie). Wraz ze zmianą kąta patrzenia kolor rozety płynnie przechodzi ze złotego w zielony.
4. Uzupełniający się druk obustronny (recto-verso). Elementy graficzne znajdujące się na obu stronach banknotu oglądane pod światło uzupełniają się i tworzą pełny obraz - koronę w owalu.
5. Patrzenie pod kątem (efekt kątowy). W zależności od kąta patrzenia z prawej strony portretu władcy widać koronę lub cyfry oznaczenia nominału “100”, z lewej zaś słowne i cyfrowe oznaczenia nominału, a pomiędzy
nimi skrót “NBP”.
6. Mikroskopijne napisy. Mikrodruki to czytelne jedynie w powiększeniu napisy umieszczone zarówno na przedniej, jak i odwrotnej stronie banknotu.
Latest articles in Special Sections
Latest news in Special Sections
Mercure - The 6 Friends Theory - Casting call
© The Warsaw Voice 2010-2018
E-mail Marketing Powered by SARE