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The Polish government may face further complications in the ongoing dispute with the EU, the daily Dziennik Gazeta Prawna wrote against the background of the approaching visit of the Council of Europe delegation to Warsaw.
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THE POLISH SCIENCE VOICE
THE POLISH SCIENCE VOICE


Mercure - The 6 Friends Theory - Casting call
The Polish Science Voice  
No 8
The Polish Science Voice

A publication Co-financed by Minister of Science and Higher Education
Scientists, politicians and the public are increasingly aware of the dangers of global warming and of the threats to the environment. At one time, when we switched on the lights in our homes or offices, we were perhaps aware that energy resources were being depleted-remember Upton Sinclair's King Coal of 1917-but we did not necessarily worry about the hole in the ozone layer or the greenhouse effect. Today we live in a different world.
Jerzy Buzek, Polish prime minister from 1997 to 2001, now a member of the European Parliament and its rapporteur for energy technology development, talks to Ewa Dereń.
As their fossil fuel reserves begin to run out, European Union countries are launching a number of research programs to develop alternative power generation technology based on hydrogen and fuel cells. One such program is the Polish Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform.
Amid fears of climate change and escalating prices of traditional fuels, renewable energy may soon become one of the fastest developing sectors of Polish industry.
The southwestern Polish city of Wrocław is vying to be chosen as the location of the new European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT).
A number of award-winning Polish inventions were exhibited at Warsaw's Museum of Technology March 10-16 during an event called the 15th Innovation Fair.
Thanks to its scientific achievements and high educational standards, the Warsaw University of Technology has earned a place among the world's most renowned schools of higher education.
With a new invention from Polish researchers, blind people may no longer have to rely on a white cane or a seeing-eye dog.
Polish and U.S. officials March 10 signed a new Fulbright Agreement in Washington to continue the exchange of students, scholars and teachers between the two countries. The agreement significantly raises the financial contribution of the Polish side, and consequently enables more people to not only study in Poland and the United States, but also to teach and carry out scientific research on a much larger scale than previously.
Polish archeologists have carved out a reputation for themselves as some of the world's top experts in Mediterranean archeology. Much of the credit for that goes to Prof. Kazimierz Michałowski (1901-1981), the founder of Polish archeology in Egypt.
Prof. Włodzimierz Kurnik, head of the Warsaw University of Technology:
Higher incomes for farmers, less herbicides and pesticides used in agriculture, and the emergence of new life-saving drugs-these are the main benefits of biotechnology and genetic engineering, their advocates say.
The Master of Business Administration (MBA) has long been an internationally recognized managerial qualification. So much so that it appears to be becoming a victim of its own success. The ever growing number of MBA holders is threatening to devalue the qualification.
In an era of growing competition for jobs, prestigious professional qualifications are particularly valuable. In many cases, they are a ticket to an international career.
Archeologists from the Podlaskie Museum in the eastern city of Białystok have stumbled across the remains of an early medieval settlement at Trzcianka near Sokółka, northeastern Poland. The excavations have revealed that the settlement was most probably inhabited by Slavs, who were invaded and murdered by either Vikings or Balts, or a combination of both. The invaders used sophisticated iron weapons, including various types of arrowheads, the archeologists said.
An international program known as Foresight uses scientific methods to predict future trends.
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