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The Warsaw Voice » Polish Science Voice » August 1, 2014
The Polish Science Voice  
No. 77
The Polish Science Voice

A publication Co-financed by National Center For Research and Development
Doctors have selected around 600 patients suffering from obesity, anemia, hypertension, and type 1 diabetes. For this group, scientists have produced special juices, cookies, bread, dessert concentrates, jellies, instant soups, pate, bread, pasta, and groats. Provided with all these products, the patients were asked to prepare their own dishes to suit their taste. These patients are part of a project that aims to develop a new form of bioactive food designed to help patients with specific diseases. The project is being managed by Prof. Józef Korczak, head of the Department of Human Nutrition at the Poznań University of Life Sciences in western Poland. After nine weeks of this diet therapy, it will be possible to determine if these special foods help improve the condition of the patients.
Fruit sorting machine maker Sorter from the central city of Radom has developed new technology that helps select the best fruit, group it according to color, shape and size, and then pack it. When working on the technology, Sorter used financial support from the European Union and Polish government funds, including a grant from the National Center for Research and Development (NCBiR).
Prof. Józef Korczak, head of the Department of Human Nutrition at the Poznań University of Life Sciences in western Poland and head of a project that aims to develop a new form of bioactive food designed to help patients with specific diseases, talks to Karolina Olszewska.
Despite many new drugs and therapeutic procedures in the field of oncology, the earliest possible detection of cancer is still the best method of giving patients the best chance of battling the disease.
Capsules one billionth of a meter in size carrying a drug directly to tumor cells—this new cancer treatment technique has been developed by scientists from the Biomedical Engineering Laboratory at the Warsaw University of Technology.
A team of doctors and computer gurus from Warsaw led by Iwona Ługowska, of the Institute of Oncology in Warsaw, is working to create a special information technology system for cancer specialists.
A team of researchers from the Łódź University of Technology in central Poland has developed an innovative method for the production of special hydrogel dressings for hard-to-heal wounds. The dressings are based on a natural biopolymer called bionanocellulose. They are produced using a strain of the Gluconacetobacter xylinus bacteria.
A researcher in the coastal city of Gdańsk is studying herpes viruses to see how they affect the immune systems of animals such as cows and pigs. The research could help scientists develop more effective drugs and vaccines for humans.
Appropriate dosing of light could help farmers prevent many diseases affecting animals in breeding establishments, says Elżbieta Turkowska, a young researcher from the University of Warsaw. This is because melatonin, the light-sensitive hormone produced by the pineal gland that controls the sleep-wake cycle in both people and animals, improves the work of the immune system, she argues.
A researcher in the coastal city of Gdańsk is studying herpes viruses to see how they affect the immune systems of animals such as cows and pigs. The research could help scientists develop more effective drugs and vaccines for humans.
Can the production of fertilizers be a form of environmental protection? Yes, if the fertilizers are produced from waste.
More than a dozen scientists from Poland are among 700 researchers working on an international project to design more sensitive gravitational wave detectors, in an effort to solve one of the fundamental riddles in modern astrophysics.
Scientists from the AGH University of Science and Technology in Cracow have developed Poland’s first voice-based identification system.
There are all kinds of surprising objects found under the ground during the construction of roads, bridges and similar projects. The secrets of what lies beneath the surface can be uncovered by using ground-penetrating radar (GPR). This method is increasingly used in civil engineering as well as in geology, environmental studies and archaeology.
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