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The Polish Science Voice  
No. 76
The Polish Science Voice

A publication Co-financed by National Center For Research and Development
The human factor is key to business success. It is also crucial in science. This is best illustrated by the story of Prof. Henryk Skarżyński, founder and director of the World Hearing Center in Kajetany near Warsaw. This unique facility, founded in 2012, is the main unit of the Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, a leading Polish research institute and a highly specialized hospital providing comprehensive care for patients suffering from hearing, balance, speech and sinus problems. Kajetany is where the world’s largest number of operations to improve or restore hearing has been performed for years.
The Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing in Kajetany near Warsaw is a leading Polish research institute and a highly specialized hospital providing comprehensive care for patients suffering from hearing, balance, speech and sinus problems. The institute is where the world’s largest number of operations to improve or restore hearing has been performed for years.
The Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing in Kajetany near Warsaw is a leading Polish research institute and a highly specialized hospital providing comprehensive care for patients suffering from hearing, balance, speech and sinus problems. The institute is where the world’s largest number of operations to improve or restore hearing has been performed for years.
The Polish Science Voice talks to Prof. Aleksander M. Nawrat, member of the board and development manager at the OBRUM Mechanical Instruments R&D Center in the southern city of Gliwice, a research-and-development facility that is part of Poland’s Polski Holding Obronny defense holding company.
A Polish physicist has developed a simple and inexpensive method of producing perovskites, a class of remarkable materials that could replace silicon in solar panels. In recognition of her work, Olga Malinkiewicz was named the winner of an annual competition held by the European Commission.
Polish scientists have used cabbage juice to produce an environmentally-friendly replacement for synthetic pesticides.
A 19-year-old technical school student has designed a special watch that will make it possible to quickly locate a patient or an elderly person with memory problems who has gotten lost after leaving home. The watch will also make it easier to search for missing persons in the dark.
A young researcher from the Łódź University of Technology in central Poland has developed and patented a method for the production of superflexible polymer tubes that promote the healing of damaged peripheral nerve tissue.
Some mice, if they get the chance, will drink alcohol more frequently than others, Polish scientists have demonstrated in an experiment. By studying mouse brains, the scientists hope to identify why some people are more prone to addiction than others.
Glass does not conduct electricity, but sometimes needs to be used as a conductor—for example in heated car windows or in the display of a tablet. Scientists from the Institute of Electronic Materials Technology (ITME) in Warsaw have come up with a way of applying graphene—a form of carbon just one atom thick—to make glass conduct electricity.
Molybdenum disulfide, a compound naturally occurring in rocks, may soon outclass graphene in electronic applications. Like graphene, the structure of molybdenum disulfide features single-atomic layers.
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